Vestibular Neuritis

Vestibular Neuritis

Vestibular neuritis, also called Vestibular neuritis, can be a paroxysmal, single attack of vertigo, a series of attacks, or a persistent condition that diminishes over three to six weeks. It is a type of unilateral vestibular dysfunction and may be associated with nausea, vomiting, and previous upper respiratory tract infections. It generally has no auditory symptoms, unlike labyrinthitis. Vestibular neuronitis may also be associated with eye nystagmus. The cause is not clearly understood, and the term “neuronitis” is inaccurate because there is no evidence of inflammation. The term is usually retained due to its common usage.  It appears to be caused by an imbalance of neuronal input between the left and right inner ears

Symptoms

  • Vertigo; can appear suddenly, Vertigo usually lasts for several days or weeks.
  • nausea and vomiting
  • Can be made worse by head movement. In rare cases it can take months to go away entirely. Vestibular neuronitis does not lead to loss of hearing.  A common indication is horizontal nystagmus with the fast beat towards the healthy ear

Resources

Resources

  • Drislane, Frank; Michael Benatar, Bernard Chang, Juan Acosta, Andrew Tarulli, Louis Caplan (2009). Neurology Blueprints. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. p. 54. ISBN 0-7817-9685-7.
  • Marill, Keith (1/13/2011). “Vestibular Neuronitis: Pathology”. eMedicine, Medscape Reference. Retrieved 8/7/2011
  • “Vestibular Neuronitis”. Retrieved 2008-06-28.
  • Marill, Keith. “Vestibular Neuronitis: Pathology”. eMedicine, Medscape Reference. Retrieved 8/7/2011.

Treatments

The treatment for vestibular neuronitis depends on the etiology of the dysfunction.

  • However, symptoms of vertigo can be treated in the same way as other vestibular dysfunctions, such as labyrinthitis, with vestibular rehabilitation.
  • Physical therapy
    • Although treatments will differ from patient to patient due to the variability of the severity of the condition, typical treatments prescribed by physical therapists include combinations of head and eye movements, postural changes, and walking exercises.
    • Specifically, exercises that may be prescribed include keeping eyes fixated on a specific target while moving the head, moving the head right to left at two targets at a significant distance apart, walking while keeping eyes fixated on a specific target, and walking while keeping eyes fixated on a specific target while also turning the head in different directions.
    • The main function behind repeating a combination of head and eye movements, postural changes and walking is that through this repetition, compensatory changes for the dysfunctions arising from peripheral vestibular structures may be promoted in the central vestibular system (brainstem and cerebellum).
Support Links

  • https://www.facebook.com/pages/Vestibular-neuronitis/102689646453090
  • https://vestibular.org/finding-help-support/support-directory

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