Guillain Barre Syndrome

Guillain-Barré (Ghee-yan Bah-ray) Syndrome is a rare, rapidly progressive disorder that consists of inflammation of the nerves (polyneuritis) causing muscle weakness, sometimes progressing to complete paralysis. Although the precise cause of GBS is unknown, a viral or respiratory infection precedes the onset of the syndrome in about half of the cases. This has led to the theory that GBS may be an autoimmune disease (caused by the body’s own immune system). Damage to the covering (myelin) of nerve axons (the extension of the nerve cell that conducts impulses away from the nerve cell body) results in delayed nerve signal transmission. This causes weakness of the muscles that are supplied by the damaged nerves.

The disorder is characterized by symmetrical weakness that usually affects the lower limbs first, and rapidly progresses in an ascending fashion. Patients generally notice weakness in their legs, manifesting as “rubbery legs” or legs that tend to buckle, with or without dysesthesias (numbness or tingling). As the weakness progresses upward, usually over periods of hours to days, the arms and facial muscles also become affected. Frequently, the lower cranial nerves may be affected, leading to bulbar weakness, oropharyngeal dysphagia (drooling, or difficulty swallowing and/or maintaining an open airway) and respiratory difficulties. Most patients require hospitalization and about 30% require ventilatory assistance for treatment of Type II respiratory failure. Facial weakness is also common. Eye movement abnormalities are not commonly seen in ascending GBS, but are a prominent feature in the Miller-Fisher variant. 

The following variants of GBS (acute inflammatory neuropathy or acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy) are recognized: Miller Fisher syndrome, acute motor-sensory axonal neuropathy, acute motor axonal neuropathy.

Symptoms

  • weakness in their legs, manifesting as “rubbery legs” or legs that tend to buckle
  • dysesthesias (numbness or tingling)
  • drooling, or difficulty swallowing and/or maintaining an open airway
  •  Facial weakness
  • Sensory loss, if present, usually takes the form of loss of proprioception
  • areflexia (complete loss of deep tendon reflexes)
  • deep aching pain, usually in the weakened muscles, which patients compare to the pain from overexercising.

Sensory loss, if present, usually takes the form of loss of proprioception (position sense) and areflexia (complete loss of deep tendon reflexes), an important feature of GBS. Loss of pain and temperature sensation is usually mild. In fact, pain is a common symptom in GBS, presenting as deep aching pain, usually in the weakened muscles, which patients compare to the pain from overexercising. These pains are self-limited and may be treated with standard analgesics. Bladder dysfunction may occur in severe cases but is usually transient.

In severe cases of GBS, loss of autonomic function is common, manifesting as wide fluctuations in blood pressure, orthostatic hypotension (a fall in blood pressure on standing, leading to an increased risk of collapse), and cardiac arrhythmias.

Acute paralysis in Guillain–Barré syndrome may be related to sodium channel blocking factor in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Significant issues involving intravenous salt and water administration may occur unpredictably in this patient group, resulting in SIADH, a cause of low sodium levels in the blood.

Resources

Resources

  • Burt, Christiana C.; Arrowsmith, Joseph E. (1 November 2009). “Respiratory failure”. Surgery (Oxford) 27 (11): 475–479. doi:10.1016/j.mpsur.2009.09.007.
  • Davids, H. “Guillain-Barre Syndrome”. Medscape Reference. Retrieved 3 Jan 2012.
  • Griffin JW, Li CY, Ho TW, et al (1995). “Guillain–Barré syndrome in northern China. The spectrum of neuropathological changes in clinically defined cases”. Brain 118 (3): 577–95. doi:10.1093/brain/118.3.577. PMID 7600080.
  • Ho TW, Mishu B, Li CY, et al (1995). “Guillain-Barré syndrome in northern China. Relationship to Campylobacter jejuni infection and anti-glycolipid antibodies”. Brain 118 (3): 597–605. doi:10.1093/brain/118.3.597. PMID 7600081
  • http://www.gbs-cidp.org/
  • McKhann GM, Cornblath DR, Ho T, et al (1991). “Clinical and electrophysiological aspects of acute paralytic disease of children and young adults in northern China”. Lancet 338 (8767): 593–7. doi:10.1016/0140-6736(91)90606-P. PMID 1679153.
  • Mori, M; Kuwabara, S; Fukutake, T; Hattori, T (2002). “Plasmapheresis and Miller Fisher syndrome: analysis of 50 consecutive cases”. Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry 72 (5): 680. doi:10.1136/jnnp.72.5.680. PMC PMC1737859. PMID 11971070.

Treatments

  • Plasmapheresis, filtering antibodies out of the blood stream.  Plasmapheresis hastens recovery when used within 4 weeks of the onset of symptoms.
  • administering intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg), to neutralize harmful antibodies and inflammation causing disease.  IVIg has equivalent efficacy to plasmapheresis when started within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms, and has fewer complications.
  •  IVIg is usually used first because of its ease of administration and safety profile.

Subsequent treatment consists of attempting to reduce the body’s attack on the nervous system, either by plasmapheresis, filtering antibodies out of the blood stream, or by administering intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg), to neutralize harmful antibodies and inflammation causing disease. These two treatments are equally effective and a combination of the two is not significantly better than either alone. Glucocorticoids have not been found to be effective in GBS.  Treatment is usually begun as soon as the diagnosis is made. Plasmapheresis hastens recovery when used within 4 weeks of the onset of symptoms.  IVIg has equivalent efficacy to plasmapheresis when started within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms, and has fewer complications.  IVIg is usually used first because of its ease of administration and safety profile. The use of intravenous immunoglobulins is not without risk, occasionally causing hepatitis, or in rare cases, renal failure if used for longer than five days.

Following the acute phase, treatment often consists of rehabilitation with the help of a multidisciplinary team to focus on improving activities of daily living (ADLs). Occupational therapists may offer equipment (such as wheelchair and special cutlery) to help the patient achieve ADL independence. Physiotherapists assist to correct functional movement, avoiding harmful compensations that might have a negative effect in the long run. There is also some evidence supporting physiotherapy in helping patients with Guillain–Barré syndrome regain strength, endurance, and gait quality,  as well as helping them prevent contractures, bedsores, and cardiopulmonary difficulties.  Speech and language therapists help regain speaking and swallowing ability, especially if the patient was intubated or received a tracheostomy.

Supportive care is the cornerstone of successful management in the acute patient. Of greatest concern is respiratory failure due to paralysis of the diaphragm, the muscle most important for breathing. Intubation may be needed when there is evidence of impending failure of the muscles of breathing – when the vital capacity (VC) is less than 20 ml/kg, the negative inspiratory force (NIF) is less negative (i.e., closer to zero) than -25 cmH2O, more than 30% decrease in either VC or NIF within 24 hours, rapid progression of disorder, or autonomic instability.

 

 

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