Ankylosing Spondylitis Pain

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS, from Greek ankylos, crooked; spondylos, vertebra; -itis, inflammation), previously known as Bekhterev’s disease and Marie-Strümpell disease, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the axial skeleton, with variable involvement of peripheral joints and nonarticular structures.

The signs and symptoms of ankylosing spondylitis often appear gradually, with peak onset being between 20 and 30 years of age.[4] The initial symptoms are usually a chronic dull pain in the lower back or gluteal region combined with stiffness of the lower back.[5] Individuals often experience pain and stiffness that awakens them in the early morning hours.[6] As the disease progresses, loss of spinal mobility and chest expansion, with limitation of anterior flexion, lateral flexion, and extension of the lumbar spine, are seen. Systemic features are common, with weight loss, fever, or fatigue often present.[7] Pain is often severe at rest, but improves with physical activity. However, many experience inflammation and pain to varying degrees regardless of rest and movement. AS can occur in any part of the spine or the entire spine, often with pain referred to one or the other buttock or the back of the thigh from the sacroiliac joint. Arthritis in the hips and shoulders may also occur. When the condition presents before the age of 18, it is relatively likely to cause pain and swelling of large limb joints, particularly the knee. In prepubescent cases, pain and swelling may also manifest in the ankles and feet, where heel spurs may also develop. Less commonly ectasia of the sacral nerve root sheaths may occur.

About 40% of people with AS will also experience inflammation of the anterior chamber of the eye, causing eye pain, redness, floaters and sensitivity to light. This is thought to be due to the association that both AS and uveitis have with the inheritance of the HLA-B27 antigen. Inflammation of the prostate occurs with increased frequency in men. Cardiovascular involvement may include inflammation of the aorta, aortic valve insufficiency or disturbances of the heart’s electrical conduction system. Lung involvement is characterized by progressive fibrosis of the upper portion of the lung.

There is no cure for AS, although treatments and medications can reduce symptoms and pain. It is thought that in some cases a diet low in starches found in flour products and potatoes, and high in proteins and vegetables is of benefit for AS patients.

Medication

The major types of medications used to treat ankylosing spondylitis are pain-relievers and drugs aimed at stopping or slowing the progression of the disease.

Surgery

In severe cases of AS, surgery can be an option in the form of joint replacements, particularly in the knees and hips. Surgical correction is also possible for those with severe flexion deformities (severe downward curvature) of the spine, particularly in the neck, although this procedure is considered very risky.

Physical therapy

Though physical therapy remedies have been scarcely documented, some therapeutic exercises are used to help manage lower back, neck, knee, and shoulder pain.

http://www.spondylitis.org/

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